Trial by F-Stop

Jun Shen is a writer and photographer

[All photographs and art are the property of Jun Shen Chia, with all rights reserved.]

Visit www.junshenchia.com for his portfolio

To photographers I say: you can get a computer, a scanner, and a printer, for a reasonable amount of money. So pool your resources with your friends. Make your shared space into a gallery space. Show your work there. You make your own community, and then you develop a context for the work and it automatically gets deeper. And they [the art world] will come find you.

For years, Cohen’s approach was to shoot three rolls of film over a two-hour walk, develop the rolls directly, have dinner, then go back to the darkroom, develop eight to nine prints directly from the negatives, and cast aside the rest. Cohen did this several times a week for decades. He estimates he has 600,000-800,000 images that he’s never seen or developed, not even on contact sheets.

bolus:

Camilo José Vergara 
Are there still broken down cars for kids to play in where you live? Seeing this picture made me remember the mini cooper that was left to rot across the street from one of my parents friends, never locked. I can still recall the smell of discarded leather seats. Somehow, I never see abandoned cars anymore. 

bolus:

Camilo José Vergara 

Are there still broken down cars for kids to play in where you live? Seeing this picture made me remember the mini cooper that was left to rot across the street from one of my parents friends, never locked. I can still recall the smell of discarded leather seats. Somehow, I never see abandoned cars anymore. 

(via photographsonthebrain)

Occasionally photographers discover tears in their eyes for the joy of seeing. I think it is because they’ve known a miracle. They’ve been given what they did not earn, and as is the way with unexpected gifts, the surprise carries an emotional blessing. When photographers get beyond copying the achievements of others, or just repeating their own accidental first successes, they learn that they do not know where in the world they will find pictures. Nobody does. Each photograph that works is a revelation to its supposed creator.